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D111
Associate in Science and Arts (ASA)
ALL FCC LTC OCC WVC 
Program Overview:
IECC offers excellent transfer programs for students who wish to continue their education at a four-year college or university. The Associate in Science and Arts degree fulfills requirements of the IAI General Education Core Curriculum, allowing for a smooth transition to any of the 100+ participating Illinois institutions. After successful completion of this degree, a student can generally transfer with junior status. It is the student’s responsibility to work closely with an advisor so that electives are appropriate, transferable, and applicable to the student’s major at the transfer college or university.

Program and/or Course Requirements:
The header for each group indicates the number of HOURS and/or COURSES that are needed from each for this degree.

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Communications - Required 3 Courses (9 Hours)
Prefix/Num
Title
Info
CR
SU2017
FA2017
ENG 1111
Composition I
3
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Composition I is an introductory course in composition and rhetoric emphasizing expository prose. Major focus is on organization, paragraph structure, and elimination of mechanical errors. The writing course sequence will (1) develop awareness of the writing process; (2) provide inventional, organizational, and editorial strategies; (3) stress the variety of uses for writing; and (4) emphasize critical skills in reading, thinking, and writing. Grade of C or better is required for IAI transfer credit. (Not to be used for humanities credit)

ENG 1121
Composition & Analysis
3
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ENG 1121 provides further training and practice in the comprehension and expression of written English. It focuses on organization, logic, and correct research techniques and format, including American Psychological Association and/or Modern Language Association parenthetical noting and bibliographic citations. It also includes an introduction to one genre of literature and the writing of a critical analysis of a piece of literature. The writing course sequence will (1) develop awareness of the writing process; (2) provide inventional, organizational, and editorial strategies; (3) stress the variety of uses for writing; and (4) emphasize critical skills in reading, thinking, and writing. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I. Grade of C or better is required for IAI transfer credit. (Not to be used as humanities credit)

SPE 1101
Fundamentals of Effective Speaking
3
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Short informative and persuasive speeches are prepared and presented. This course places emphasis on selection and organization of materials, methods of securing interest and attention, and elements of delivery as well as characteristics of effective criticism and listening.

Term Total
9
Mathematics - Required (3 Hours)
Prefix/Num
Title
Info
CR
SU2017
FA2017
MTH 1103
Liberal Arts Math
3
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This course is designed to fulfill general education requirements. This course focuses on mathematical reasoning and problem-solving strategies with real-life applications. Four topics, chosen from the following list, will be studied in depth: Counting techniques and probability, game theory, geometry, graph theory, linear programming, logic/set theory, mathematical modeling, mathematics of finance, statistics. The use of calculators and other technology is strongly encouraged. PREREQUISITE: PRE 0420 Intermediate Algebra with a grade of C or better, or REM 0422 Math Literacy, or two years of college preparatory algebra with a grade of C or better, or sufficient score on the placement test, or consent of instructor.

MTH 1122
Geometry for Elementary Majors
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This course is designed for elementary and special education majors. Course content shall include one-, two-, and three-dimensional point set geometry, constructions, congruence, similarity, transformational geometry, measurement, and coordinate geometry. Calculators and computers will be used in this course. This course is the second semester of a two semester sequence designed to meet state certification in elementary teaching. It fulfills the general education requirement only for students seeking state certification as elementary and/or special education teachers. PREREQUISITE: Two years college prep algebra with C or better and MTH 1121 Mathematics for Elementary Majors or consent of instructor.

MTH 1131
Introduction to Statistics
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This course is designed to introduce beginning students to the basic concepts, techniques, and applications of statistics. The main objective of the course is the development of statistical reasoning. The course is intended to meet the general education requirements. Graphing calculators and computer software packages used for calculation and analysis of data are strongly encouraged. Topics include organization, presentation, and description of data, percentiles, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, standard normal distribution, correlation and regression, probability, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, sampling, and sampling distributions. PREREQUISITE: PRE 0420 Intermediate Algebra with a grade of C or better, or REM 0422 Math Literacy, or two years of college preparatory algebra with a grade of C or better, or sufficient score on the placement test, or consent of instructor.

MTH 1151
Finite Mathematics
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This course is designed primarily for those students majoring in business, social and behavioral sciences, and nonphysical sciences. It is not designed to be taken by mathematics majors. This course emphasizes the concepts and applications of mathematics rather than mathematical structures. The following topics are covered: vectors, determinants, matrices and matrix algebra; systems of linear equations and matrices; systems of inequalities and linear programming; simplex method, set theory, Venn Diagrams, logic and Boolean algebra; counting and probability theory; stochastic processes; game theory; Markov chain methods; mathematical modeling; and the mathematics of finance. Technology will be used throughout the course. PREREQUISITE: PRE 0415 Elementary Geometry and MTH 1102 College Algebra with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor.

MTH 1152
Applied Calculus
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This calculus course is designed specifically for students in business and the social sciences and does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics. It emphasizes applications of the basic concepts of calculus rather than proofs. Topics must include limits; techniques of differentiation applied to polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; partial derivatives and applications; maxima and minima of functions; and elementary techniques of integration including substitution and integration by parts. Business and social science applications are stressed throughout the course. PREREQUISITE: Four years of college preparatory mathematics with grades of C or better or MTH 1102 College Algebra with grade of C or better or consent of instructor.

MTH 1153
Statistics
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This course is intended for students who need an upper level statistics course to meet a specific program requirement. It also meets the general education requirement in mathematics. Graphing calculators and computer software packages used for calculation and analysis of data are strongly encouraged. Topics include organization, presentation, and description of data, percentiles, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, standard normal distribution, correlation and regression, probability, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, sampling, sampling distributions, and research methods. PREREQUISITE: MTH 1102 College Algebra or equivalent with grade of C or better.

MTH 1171
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
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A first course in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include:basic techniques of differentiation and integration with applications including curve sketching, anti differentiation, the Reimann integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, transcendental functions and applications of the definite integral. Technology will be used throughout the course. Students are strongly advised to complete this sequence at one institution. PREREQUISITE: Four years of college preparatory mathematics including geometry, trigonometry, and algebra, or MTH 1102 College Algebra and MTH 1105 Trigonometry, with grades of C or better, or the consent of the instructor.

MTH 1172
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
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A second course in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include:applications of integration, exponential, logarithmic and other transcendental functions, techniques of integration, infinite series, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and conic sections. Technology will be used throughout the course. Students are strongly advised to complete this sequence at one institution. PREREQUISITE: MTH 1171 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I, or its equivalent with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

MTH 2173
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
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A third course in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics will include:two- and three-dimensional spaces, functions of several variables, vectors, line integrals, surface integrals, differential and integral calculus of multivariate functions including partial derivatives and multiple integrals, as well as applications of these topics. Technology will be used throughout the course. Students are strongly advised to complete this sequence at one institution. PREREQUISITES:MTH 1172 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

Term Total
3
Physical and Life Sciences - Required (7 Hours) Include 1 life, 1 physical, & 1 lab
Prefix/Num
Title
Info
CR
SU2017
FA2017
LIFE SCIENCES:
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LSC 1101
General Biology I
4
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This is a general introduction to the evolutionary study of life. A brief history of biology, natural selection, cell theory, cell structure and function, chemistry of life, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, cell division, patterns of inheritance, DNA, biotechnology, developmental biology and reproduction will be included. Related laboratory exercises will be incorporated. This course is the first class in an introductory sequence for biological sciences majors. NO PREREQUISITE.

LSC 1102
General Biology II
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This course is a continuation of LSC 1101 General Biology I with emphasis placed on tissues, organs, organ systems and organisms. This course will involve a survey of biological macroevolution and microevolution, origin of life and the species, environmental biology, viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae, plants, and animals including the invertebrates and vertebrates. Related laboratory exercises will be incorporated. This course is the second class in the sequence for biological sciences majors. PREREQUISITE: Two years of high school biology or completion of LSC 1101 General Biology I or its equivalent or permission of instructor.

LSC 1105
Environmental Biology
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This course is a study of the relationships of natural resources to human's social and economic welfare. It is designed to make students aware of components, structures, and functions of ecological processes and human impacts on the environment. It includes the history and causes of present environmental problems and analysis of proposed solutions.

LSC 1106
Introduction to Biology
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This course is designed for the non-science major student. The course provides laboratory experience and lecture concepts that help the non-science major student understand the principles of biology. Concepts include information pertaining to the scientific method, cellular biology, evolution, heredity, and genetic engineering, ecology, and ecosystems, as well as human population and pollution concerns. An inquiry-based approach to understanding biological processes is emphasized. NO PREREQUISITE.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES:
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CHM 1120
Introductory Chemistry
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This course examines definitions, history, and theories of chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, bonding, mole concept, and stoichiometry. Also discussed are gas laws, solutions, and acid-base equilibrium. The course is recommended for non-science majors, nursing and allied health majors. Science credit is not granted for both CHM 1120 and CHM 1130. PREREQUISITES:PRE 0420 Intermediate Algebra or high school algebra.

CHM 1130
General Chemistry I
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This course introduces evidence for the components of the atom and an in-depth study of modern atomic theory based on atomic spectra. Other topics include the chemical bond, stoichiometry, electrolysis, kinetic molecular theory, thermochemistry changes of state, solutions, and redox. Science credit not granted for both CHM 1130 and CHM 1120. PREREQUISITE: High school chemistry or CHM 1120 Introductory Chemistry, three years of high school mathematics or MTH 1102 College Algebra, or consent of the instructor.

GEG 1101
Introduction to Physical Geography
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A survey of Earth's physiographic features, physical geography includes several natural sciences: atmosphere and oceans, weather, climate, soils and soil formation, and others. The focus of physical geography is on the life layer, a shallow zone of the atmosphere, lands and oceans.

GEG 1103
Introductory Meteorology
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This course will provide an introduction to atmospheric science leading to a better understanding of day-to-day weather, including frontal systems and severe storms. Students may elect to take the regular class offering or one with the included lab.

GEL 1110
General Geology
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This course is an introduction to geology that covers the earth, its minerals, rocks and natural resources including the basic geologic principles from a physical and historical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on geologic principles necessary for an understanding of minerals, rocks, weathering and erosion, geologic mapping, petroleum, ground water and glaciation. An examination of the internal and external processes modifying the earth’s surface, the evolutionary history of the earth, including its life forms, oceans and atmosphere will also be included.

GEL 1112
Physical Geology
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This course covers materials of the earth's crust, structures, and geologic features. Geologic processes and concepts are studied. Common rock forming minerals and rock identifications are included in laboratory work. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and aerial photographs are also studied.

GEL 2111
Environmental Geology
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Examines human interaction with geologic processes and hazards, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, subsidence, hydrology and flooding; occurrence and availability of geologic resources, such as energy, water and minerals; and land use planning, pollution, waste disposal, environmental impact, health and law. (IAI: P1 908L)

PHY 1110
Survey of Physics
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PHY 1110 is designed for non-science majors. This course emphasizes the relevance of physics to twenty-first century living. The guiding principle in selecting topics for this course is to present basic concepts that are relevant to an informed individual in today's society. The student will be involved not only in the body of knowledge that is physics but also in the method that is in physics. Credit for this course cannot be applied toward a major or minor in physics. Credit for this course cannot be awarded to an individual who has successfully completed a previous course in college physics. PREREQUISITE: A grade of C or better in REM 0421 Beginning Algebra, or a grade of C or better in the first year of high school algebra, or a sufficient score on the placement test.

PHY 1120
Physics I
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This trigonometry-based course is the first of a two-semester sequence structured for students in pre-professional curricula. It covers kinematics in one and two dimensions, Newton's laws, gravitation, work, energy, impulse, momentum, torque, equilibrium, rotation of rigid bodies, elasticity, simple harmonic motion, fluids statics and dynamics, heat transfer, thermal properties of matter, laws of thermodynamics, and sound. PREREQUISITE: MTH 1105 Trigonometry or current registration in MTH 1105.

PHY 2110
General Physics I
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This is a calculus-based course in mechanics and heat. It covers kinematics in one and two dimensions, Newton's laws, gravitation, work, energy, impulse, momentum, torque, equilibrium, rotation of rigid bodies, elasticity, simple harmonic motion, fluid statics and dynamics, heat transfer, thermal properties of matter, first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the kinetic theory of gases. PREREQUISITE: MTH 1171 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I or current registration in MTH 1171.

PSC 1101
Intro to Physical Science
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This course will provide the students with an introduction to the physical sciences discipline. The subjects that will be covered in this course will include at least two of the following:astronomy, chemistry, physics, and earth science. This course is designed for students wanting a general education background in the physical sciences.

PSC 1111
Introduction to Astronomy
3
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This course is a survey of astronomical facts, concepts, and relationships. Topics include the solar system, stars and galaxies, planetary motions, comets and meteors, star distances, atoms and radiation, and the origin and evolution of the universe. This course is designed for the non-science major.

PSC 1112
Introduction to Astronomy Lab
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This course gives students experience using various instruments to make astronomical observations. The fundamental measurements of astronomy (angles, brightness and time) will be undertaken. Observations will be made during bright and dark sky conditions. Meeting times will be arranged according to almanac and weather conditions. PREREQUISITE: Concurrent registration (or successful completion) of PSC 1111 Introduction to Astronomy or permission of instructor.

Term Total
7
Humanities / Fine Arts - Required (9 Hours) Include at least: 1 humanities and 1 fine arts
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Title
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CR
SU2017
FA2017
HUMANITIES:
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LIT 2101
Introduction to Literature
3
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Introduction to Literature presents the basic techniques of poetry, drama, and fiction. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2111
American Literature to 1855
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American Literature to 1855 is a study of American authors from colonial times through the Romantic Movement, with emphasis on historical trends and major authors through analysis of representative texts. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2112
American Literature Since 1855
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American Literature Since 1855 is a study of American authors from the Age of Realism through the Modern Period, with emphasis on literary trends and major authors through analysis of representative texts. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I.

LIT 2121
English Literature to 1800
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A study of English prose, poetry, and drama from the Middle Ages through the Restoration is covered in this course with emphasis on literary trends and major authors through analysis of representative texts. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2122
English Literature Since 1800
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A study of English prose, poetry, and drama from the Romantics to the present will be covered with emphasis on literary trends and major authors through analysis of representative texts. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2131
World Literature to 1620
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World Literature to 1620 is a historical, critical, and analytical study of representative ancient and medieval literature. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2132
World Literature Since 1620
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World Literature since 1620 is a historical, critical, and analytical study of representative literature from the Age of Neoclassicism to the present. PREREQUISITES:ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2135
Women in Literature
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This course will examine the ways in which women are represented in various genres of literature. The course will cover various time periods, focusing on a wide range of women's experiences. Women as writers and as characters will be examined. The historical and social considerations both within the texts and surrounding the writers and how they influence the role of women in literature will also be examined. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2141
Understanding Poetry
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This course fosters understanding and enjoying poetry, with emphasis on reading and analyzing many poems, particularly the shorter forms, selected from old and new poetry. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2142
Understanding Drama
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This course emphasizes understanding and appreciating drama and includes reading and analyzing a variety of plays. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

LIT 2143
Understanding the Short Story
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Reading and analysis of short stories from a variety of periods. Approaches to determining literary meaning, form, and value. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of the instructor.

LIT 2145
Children's Literature
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Children’s Literature provides a study of the major genres, themes, and critical concerns of literature written for children and young adults with special attention to the historical, social, and cultural contexts that have influenced literature for young people. Written reactions to texts and formal interpretations of the literature are integral components of the course. Students will also critically analyze the age-appropriateness of children’s books as well as strategies for writing about cultural, ethnic, religious, and societal implications and differences. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I.

LIT 2151
Shakespeare
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This course includes a study of Elizabethan theater and Shakespearean stage conventions. Representative tragedies, comedies, and histories will be studied with emphasis on Shakespeare's style, characterization, and philosophy. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or instructor's approval.

LIT 2181
Mythology
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Mythology includes cultural myths from around the world, focusing on gods and heroes. Types of myths read may include creation, fertility, and hero stories, ranging from the classical mythology of Greece and Rome to more contemporary ones from North American Indians and African tribes. PREREQUISITE: ENG 1111 Composition I or consent of instructor.

PHI 1111
Introduction to Philosophy
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This course is an introduction to the principles and problems in Philosophy. Major philosophers and schools of philosophical thought are studied.

PHI 2101
Introduction to Ethics
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A study of the principal ethical theories and concepts of human conduct and character, as well as a critical evaluation of these theories and concepts as they apply to particular moral problems and decisions. Transfer students will continue to take PHI 2101 as an IAI GECC articulated three credit hour course.

PHI 2111
Introduction to Logic
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This course is an introduction to formal reasoning and includes studies in language and meaning, deduction and induction, evidence, syllogistic argument and propaganda.

PHI 2121
Philosophy of Religion
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This course is a philosophical analysis of selected religious concepts and beliefs such as the existence of God, nature of good and evil, after-life and ethics.

SPN 2121
Intermediate Spanish II
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A fourth semester course (or above) in a foreign language that is designed to increase proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing in the language as well as providing knowledge of the culture or cultures of peoples who speak the language. The nature of writing assignments must be appropriate to both the level and the target language. PREREQUISITE: SPN 2112 Intermediate Spanish I or equivalent.

HUMANITIES/ FINE ARTS:
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HUM 2151
Introduction to Asian Culture
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This multi-disciplined course is designed to give students the opportunity to understand Asian culture. History, literature, art, religion, economics, political science, and sociology of Asian cultures are studied.

HUM 2161
Forging the American Character
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History of the major developments in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Considers the ways in which American's have extended the Western tradition and America's distinctive cultural contributions.

FINE ARTS:
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ART 1141
Cinema Appreciation
3
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This course is a survey of the cinema, studying the major film movements in theatrical motion pictures from their origin to the present. The development of the cinematic art is traced technically, artistically, theoretically, culturally, and critically. All elements of the cinema medium are examined, while film form and content are investigated through students' viewing major selected feature films.

ART 1181
Art History I
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This course explores the historical development of visual arts (painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, architecture, and popular visual culture) in society, focusing on major artistic styles and movements from Ancient to Medieval times. Furthermore, the class examines works of art as expressions of the ideas and beliefs of artists within their cultural and social contexts.

ART 2101
Understanding Art
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Understanding Art is an introduction to the creation, perception, evaluation and nature of visual art. This course examines the principles and elements used in the creation of art and its major forms of presentation. Furthermore, students will explore problems in visual culture and critical theory. This course will give the student a broader appreciation of art and is designed to partially fulfill the humanities requirement.

ART 2181
Art History II
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A continuation of ART 1181; this course explores the historical development of visual arts (painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and architecture) in Western society, focusing on major artistic styles and movements from pre-renaissance to contemporary times. Furthermore, the class examines works of art as expressions of the ideas and beliefs of artists within their cultural and social contexts.

ART 2191
Non-Western Art
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A survey of the indigenous visual arts of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Many works of art will be examined for their social, religious, philosophical, and aesthetic content.

DRA 1111
Introduction to Theatre
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This course is an overview of theories, methodologies and skills involved in theatre arts. Emphasis is placed upon the study of theatre as a composite art. History, directing, designing, acting, playwriting, critiquing and physical aspects of the theatre are covered.

HUM 1111
Intro to Art Music and Theatre
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This course is a non-traditional, interdisciplinary course in the humanities. It focuses on the interrelationships and aesthetic commonalties in the visual and performing arts.

MUS 1101
Music Appreciation
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Introduction to representative music masterpieces through perceptive listening. Emphasis on the elements of music, various forms and periods, and great composers and performances.

MUS 1102
History of American Music
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This course is designed to create interest in American music, its media, and basic concepts of form and style. Emphasis is placed upon appreciating and understanding trends in music of the United States through use of representative selections.

MUS 1103
Music in Multicultural America
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This course is a study of the role of music in the social and cultural life of the United States. The focus is on the varied and complex roles of music making in community life. Emphasis is given to the diversity of musical styles, genres, and repertoires that make up the American soundscape.

MUS 1104
World Music
3
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This course is a study of representative music of the non-western world using an active-listening approach. It will emphasize its function within world cultures.

MUS 2131
Music History I
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The historical development of Western music, including various musical styles and periods, and the contributions of key composers, conductors, and performers in shaping the Western musical tradition. Emphasizes concepts, structure, musical idioms and aesthetics.

MUS 2132
Music History II
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This class is a continuation of MUS 2131. This course continues to explore the historical development of western music, including various musical styles and periods, and the contributions of key composers, conductors and performers in shaping the western musical tradition. Emphasizes concepts, structure, musical idioms and aesthetics. PREREQUISITE: MUS 2131 Music History I.

Term Total
9
Social and Behavioral Sciences - Required (9 Hours) Include courses from at least 2 disciplines
Prefix/Num
Title
Info
CR
SU2017
FA2017
ANT 2101
Introduction to Anthropology
3
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Anthropology is concerned with the physical and cultural development of the human kind. Emphasis will be given to cultures, human adaptability, and interaction between man and society.

ANT 2102
Cultural Anthropology
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This course in cultural anthropology, as an adaptive mechanism that provides for the survival of the human species, provides a basic introduction to the concept of culture by surveying world cultures and by studying relevant theories and principles of cultural behavior such as social organization, technology, economics, religion and language as used by various peoples, both past and present. An introduction is also given to important figures in anthropology and their contribution to the discipline.

ECN 1101
Introduction to Economics
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This is an introduction to essentials of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and practice. Macroeconomic study includes the essentials of consumer demand, producers supply decisions, market structure, labor market behavior, competitive versus monopolistic market behaviors and government intervention. In addition, microeconomic study includes the essentials of the business cycle, unemployment, inflation, government policy, Federal Reserve along with the study of fiscal and monetary policy.

ECN 2101
Principles of Macroeconomics
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The American system of economics is introduced. Subject matter includes an introduction to the sectors of the American economy, business, households, government, the theory of supply and demand, national income accounts, the business cycle, inflation, unemployment, Keynesian theory, the Federal Reserve System and uses of money, international trade, balance of trade, balance of payments, exchange rate systems, and economics of developing countries. Attention will be given to application and illustration of theory to current problems. Global economics content, and the role of the United States in formulating, influencing and directing global trade and policy, will be infused throughout the course.

ECN 2102
Principles of Microeconomics
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This course is concerned with the study of specific economic units. It introduces the student to generalized models of business, structures of the American economy, price and output determination of firms and industries, problems related to these segments, and a general review of the operation of the price system. It includes a study of the mechanics of supply and demand, price and consumer behavior. International trade and a review of the stock market are included.

GEG 1102
World Geography
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This course covers the geographical structure of the world; natural, human, and cultural regional patterns of people; places and products, and their interrelations, and man's occupancy for the natural environmental regions of the world.

HIS 1104
History of Eastern Civilizations I
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This course covers political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Asian world from the Mongols to 1600. PREREQUISITE: Reading and writing skills at the college level.

HIS 1105
History of Eastern Civilizations II
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This course covers political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Asian world from 1600 to present. PREREQUISITE: Reading and writing skills at the college level.

HIS 1111
Western Civilization Before 1600 AD
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This is a survey of western civilization from the prehistoric times through the Reformation. Major topics include Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman civilizations, the rise of Christianity, the Middle Ages, Renaissance and the Reformation.

HIS 1112
Western Civilization After 1600 AD
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This is an introductory course surveying the political, social and economic forces that have shaped the western world since 1600 AD. Major topics include the rise of European states, the French Revolution, Napoleon Industrial Revolution, nationalism, imperialism, World War I, World War II, postwar problems including the Cold War and Arms race.

HIS 1120
World History to 1500
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This course is a survey of world civilizations from prehistory to 1500, with a focus on economic, social, political, and cultural developments in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, including interactions between peoples and the development of regional and global networks of relationships.

HIS 1121
World History Since 1500
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This course is a survey of world history from 1500 to the contemporary era, with a focus on the economic, social, political, and cultural convergence, in addition to continued distinctiveness, throughout the world over the past five centuries and also including the development of both regional and global trends and relationships that have shaped the world since 1500.

HIS 2101
U.S. History to 1877
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In this course students will study the colonial period; the independence movement; the framing and adoption of the Constitution; the growth of American nationality; Western development and Jacksonian Democracy; Manifest Destiny and the slave controversy; and the Civil War.

HIS 2102
U.S. History Since 1877
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In this course students will study Reconstruction; the new industrial society and the agrarian movement; the war with Spain; the United States as a world power; the progressive movement; the First World War; post war problems; the Depression and the New Deal; the Second World War and foreign and domestic post war problems.

HUM 2131
Intro to Latin American Culture
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This multi-disciplined course is designed to give students the opportunity to understand a Hispanic culture. History, literature, art, religion, economics, political science, and sociology of a Hispanic culture are studied. It may be repeated for up to six semester hours of credit. Field trips to significant regional museums is encouraged.

PLS 2103
State and Local Government
3
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This course is a survey of the structure and functions of American states and local government.

PLS 2106
Introduction to International Relations
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This course discusses how a nation's foreign policy is developed. Political leaders, industrial and military potential, and strategic location are stressed along with a study of the United Nations.

PSY 1101
General Psychology I
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A survey of the study of human and animal behavior with emphasis on the scientific nature of contemporary psychological investigation. Topics may include the biology of behavior, sensation, motivation, emotion, life-span development of behavior, personality, abnormal behavior and its therapies, social behavior, and individual differences. NO PREREQUISITE.

PSY 1108
Psychological Aspects of Aging
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An introduction to the subject of human aging as a stage of life covering such facets as the psychological, emotional, cognitive, and interpersonal. PREREQUISITE: PSY 1101 General Psychology I, or consent of instructor.

PSY 2104
Child Psychology
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This course is designed to give a comprehensive approach to theory of child development. Topics may include prenatal development, genetics, motor, language, cognitive, emotional, and social development from infancy to adolescence. This course will emphasize the integration of biological, psychological, and social/cultural factors in the development of the child. Theoretical material, research, and an introduction to research methodology applied to the study of childhood will be presented. PREREQUISITE: PSY 1101 General Psychology I or consent of instructor.

PSY 2105
Adolescent Psychology
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This course studies the adolescent in relation to family, friends, the opposite sex, delinquent behavior, growth and development, attitudes, interests and values. PREREQUISITE: PSY 1101 General Psychology I or consent of instructor.

PSY 2107
Social Psychology
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This course investigates the behavior of the individual, as influenced by others. Topics include characteristics of groups, group dynamics, the nature of culture, effective leadership, methods of negotiation, inner-group relations, propaganda and other forms of persuasive communication. PREREQUISITE: PSY 1101 General Psychology I or consent of instructor.

PSY 2109
Human Growth and Development
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This course is a study of the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of the individual across the entire human lifespan. Emphasis is placed upon development of emotional states, typical patterns of adjustments, principles of human growth, and practical applications of research findings to everyday life. PREREQUISITE: PSY 1101 General Psychology I or consent of instructor.

SOC 1107
The Sociology of Sex & Gender
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This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on sex and gender as a factor in social stratification, gender role acquisition, and individual and social consequences of changing social definition of gender roles. The human relations/cultural diversity requirement is satisfied by this course.

SOC 1108
Race and Ethnic Relations
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This course provides a sociological overview of the racial and ethnic relations in America from both an historical and contemporary perspective. Current theories and research relating to the formation of racial/ethnic identities, sources of prejudice and discrimination, social interaction, and persistence of ethnic and racial divisions will be examined.

SOC 2101
Principles of Sociology
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A study of society, including the rules, interactions and cultural patterns that organize everyday life. Includes the analysis of social conflict, the structure and function of institution, the dynamics of individual and group interactions, social stratification and interactions among diverse groups of people.

SOC 2102
Social Problems and Trends
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This course examines the nature of social problems: adapting to nature, population, control and care of defectives, family and child welfare, crime, ethnicity, and sexual variance. Agencies of social control are discussed along with the origins, improvement, and finding workable solutions to social problems.

SOC 2103
Marriage & Family
3
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This course is designed to challenge students to better understand the interrelationships between cultural, society and family, and survey the contemporary family in historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Topics for this course include trends in mate selection, marriage, child-rearing, employment, gender roles and communication within the family.

Term Total
9
Major / Elective Credit - Required (27 Hours)
Prefix/Num
Title
Info
CR
SU2017
FA2017
Maj/Elective Credit
Major/Elective Credits
27
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Term Total
27
College Orientation - Highly Recommended - (1 Hour)
Prefix/Num
Title
Info
CR
Program Total
64


We recommend that you contact an advisor before enrolling in any degree, certificate, or transfer program to ensure all requirements are met including total hours associated with transfer courses.

marked This is a General Education or Elective course to be selected and therefore has no schedule link.

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